Asian Journal of Research in Nephrology https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Asian Journal of Research in Nephrology</strong>&nbsp;aims to publish&nbsp;high-quality&nbsp;papers (<a href="/index.php/AJRN/general-guideline-for-authors">Click here for Types of paper</a>) in all areas of&nbsp;‘Nephrology research’. By not excluding papers based on novelty, this journal facilitates the research and wishes to publish papers as long as they are technically correct and scientifically motivated. The journal also encourages the submission of useful reports of negative results. This is a quality controlled, OPEN peer-reviewed, open-access INTERNATIONAL journal.</p> Asian Journal of Research in Nephrology en-US Asian Journal of Research in Nephrology Relation of Immunosuppressive Drugs with BK Virus Infection in Renal Allograft Recipient Cases https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/73 <p><strong>Background: </strong>Human polyoma viruses are the members of the papova virus family. The most known species of this kind are BK-virus (BKV), JC-virus (JCV) and Simian-virus (SV-40). BK (polyma) virus causes allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. The incidence of BK virus infection among renal transplant recipients in Bangladesh is unknown.</p> <p><strong>Objectives: </strong>To find out the frequency of BK virus infection in renal allograft recipients at sixth month after transplantation.</p> <p><strong>Materials and Methods: </strong>This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Nephrology at BSMMU, Dhaka. A total of 29 adult patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled from the period of July 2015 to June 2016 by convenient sampling. All relevant information from the renal allograft recipients were collected. Blood and urine of these patients were tested for BK viral DNA by PCR.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> The frequency of BK virus infection among the enrolled 29 renal transplanted patients was found to be 20.7%. The mean age of BK virus infected patients was 28.67±11.55 years. Among the 6 patients found infected by BK virus, 5(83.3%) were male. Among the 16 tacrolimus (TAC) treated patients, BK virus was detected in 3(18.7%) patients whereas among the 13 cyclosporin (CIC) treated patients, BK virus was detected in 3(23.1%) patients. 2(33.33%) of the BK virus infected patients developed asymptomatic BK virus infection with impaired graft function.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion: </strong>Our data highlights that BK virus infection is prevalent in our center.</p> Md. Mustafizur Rahman Sondipon Malaker Md. Shaheen Reza Amir Mohammad Kaiser Salahuddin Feroz Copyright (c) 2024 Rahman et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-01-25 2024-01-25 7 1 31 38 Hypertension in Renal Transplant Patients: A Prospective Descriptive and Analytical Study https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/74 <p>The prevalence of hypertension in kidney transplant patients is significant. The physiological circadian evolution of blood pressure (BP) shows a nocturnal decrease of 10 to 20%, called dipping rate. According to this dipping rate, several profiles have been determined, some of which were correlated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events. We set two main objectives for this study: to evaluate the prevalence of hypertension in kidney transplant patients and to determine the dipping rate of hypertensive transplant patients in our series, and its impact on albuminuria. 62 renal transplant patients were included in this study. They underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) with the Suntech AccuWin Pro device in a nephrology department. Arterial hypertension (AH) and dipper status were defined according to the 2018 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) recommendations. A Mann Whitney test assessed the impact of dipper status on albuminuria. The prevalence of hypertension was 52% in a population with a median age of 44 years; 67% of patients had albuminuria &gt;30 mg/24 hours. 3% of hypertensive patients were dippers, 42% of patients were nondippers, and 6% of patients were reverse dippers. A correlation between albuminuria and reverse dipper profile was found with a p = 0.044. In renal transplant recipients, arterial hypertension is a major risk factor of graft loss.&nbsp; Blood pressure control in our population is suboptimal, especially in a population where the impact of nocturnal hypertension on markers of renal damage is well documented.</p> Ghattas Mohamed Amine Kharrat Assia Medkouri Ghislaine Naoufal Mtioui Selma Elkhayat Mohamed Ali Zamd Mohamed Benghanem Gharbi Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-02-24 2024-02-24 7 1 39 44 Evaluation of Renal Function and Other Relevant Parameters in Living Kidney Donors after Nephrectomy https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/76 <p><em><strong>Background: </strong></em><em>Kidney transplantation, especially from a living donor, is a preferred treatment for many with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Unilateral nephrectomy reduces total glomerular filtration rate (GFR), impacting kidney function, arterial hypertension, proteinuria, and other biochemical issues. Evaluation and follow-up of donors are crucial. </em><em>This study aimed to evaluate the renal function and other relevant parameters in living kidney donors after nephrectomy. </em></p> <p><em><strong>Methods:</strong></em><em> This prospective, observational was conducted in the Department of Nephrology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2017 to August 2018. A total of 25 adult patients who underwent donor nephrectomy were purposively enrolled as study subjects. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 23.0. </em></p> <p><strong>Results:</strong> Participants' serum creatinine levels significantly (p&lt;0.05) rose at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-months post-surgery compared to baseline. Both 24-hour creatinine clearance and eGFR significantly (p&lt;0.05) decreased at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. GFR was notably (p&lt;0.05) lower at 6- and 12-months post-surgery. Conversely, 24-hour urinary total protein (UTP) levels significantly (p&lt;0.05) increased at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. From baseline to 12 months’ post-donation, serum intact parathyroid hormone and uric acid levels were notably (p&lt;0.05) higher, while hemoglobin, serum calcium, serum phosphorus, and serum albumin levels were significantly (p&lt;0.05) lower. Kidney size showed significant (p&lt;0.05) increases at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-months post-surgery.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> Living kidney donors may experience a mild decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and biochemical changes following nephrectomy. However, short-term follow-up suggests that outcomes of kidney donation appear safe. Nevertheless, it's crucial to monitor living kidney donors for potential adverse outcomes of donation.</p> Rezoyana Nazim Roksana Nazim Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-04-04 2024-04-04 7 1 49 57 Hematuria as a Common Symptom of the Nutcracker Syndrome: Two Case Reports and Mini-review https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/71 <p>Nutcracker syndrome results from compression of the left renal vein (LRV), usually in the range formed by the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), leading to stenosis of the aorto-mesenteric part of the left renal vein and dilation of its distal part.</p> <p>The symptomatology remains dominated by abdominal pain and hematuria. Its diagnosis is essentially based on modern imaging means (computed tomography, ultrasound-Doppler, phlebography) and its treatment is controversial. We report two observations of patients, the first admitted for intermittent macroscopic hematuria and the second for incidentally discovered microscopic hematuria, and whose radiological exploration revealed Nutcracker syndrome.</p> Cheikh Sara Kharrat Assia Soldi Chaimaa Elouati Achraf Elkhayat Selma Mtioui Nouafal Zamd Mohamed Ali Medkouri Ghizlaine Benghanem Mohamed Copyright (c) 2024 Sara et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-01-19 2024-01-19 7 1 1 6 Recent Trends in Risk Factors Associated with Kidney Diseases https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/72 <p>The kidneys play a vital role in our overall health and well-being. Their ability to filter waste, reabsorb essential nutrients and maintain a balance of fluids and electrolytes in our body is essential for our health. However, various factors such as age-related changes, exposure to toxins, and lifestyle habits can contribute to a decline in kidney function, leading to potential health issues. Therefore, it is crucial to identify the risk factors that can cause kidney damage and take early interventive measures to slow down the progression of chronic kidney disease. By raising awareness of these risk factors, we can work towards preventing the development of chronic kidney disease and reducing the incidence of end-stage renal disease. It is important to note that several of these risk factors are modifiable, and early diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease can prevent severe complications. Through regular check-ups, identifying these risk factors through panels of tests, and taking a proactive approach towards our health, we can ensure that we maintain healthy kidney function and prevent potential health problems. In conclusion, by taking a constructive approach towards our health and being aware of the risk factors that can cause kidney damage, we can work towards maintaining healthy kidney function and preventing chronic kidney disease. Let us prioritize our health and make changes to our lifestyle habits to reduce the risk of kidney disease and ensure our long-term well-being.</p> Okolonkwo Benjamin Nnamdi Ajibo Doris Nnenna George-Opuda Maureen Ibitroko Nwahiri Jude Donatus Copyright (c) 2024 Okolonkwo et al.; This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-01-23 2024-01-23 7 1 7 30 Corticosteroids and Rashes: A Comprehensive Review https://journalajrn.com/index.php/AJRN/article/view/75 <p>Corticosteroids are the class of medications that are widely used to treat a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, they can also a number of side effects, including rashes. Corticosteroids induces rashes can range in severity from mild to severe can occur on any part of the body. The mechanism by which corticosteroids cause rashes are not fully understood, but they are thought to involve a combination of factor, including immunosuppressant and skin atrophy. A number of risk factor for developing a corticosteroids induced rash have been identified, including the type and potency of corticosteroids used, the duration of use, and the area of application. The management of corticosteroids induces rashes depends on the type of rash and its severity. Mild cases can often be managed by discontinuing the corticosteroid and using a moisturizer. More severe cases may require treatment with prescription medication, such as topical calcineurin inhibitors or pimecrolimus. The best way to prevent corticosteroids induced rashes is to use corticosteroids as direct by the doctor. This includes using the low potential corticosteroids that is effective for your condition and using the corticosteroids for the shortest period of time necessary.</p> Shravan Kumar Dholi D. Ruchitha Reddy Copyright (c) 2024 Author(s). The licensee is the journal publisher. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2024-03-18 2024-03-18 7 1 45 48